Jul 272016
 

Here are some scenes captured this week on this divers’ paradise known as Bonaire.

This reef butterflyfish was spotted near the dive site Front Porch

This Reef Butterflyfish was spotted near the dive site Front Porch.

Also seen at Front Porch was this Yellowhead Jawfish.

Also seen at Front Porch was this Yellowhead Jawfish.

Looking north into the town of Kralendijk from Windsock Beach.

Looking north into the town of Kralendijk from Windsock Beach.

A Pelican perches atop a rocky outcrop near Pink Beach.

A Pelican perches atop a rocky outcrop near Pink Beach.

Turquoise waves crash over the rocks at Pink Beach.

Turquoise waves crash over the rocks at Pink Beach.

A Pelican soars over the ocean searching for prey.

A Pelican soars over the ocean searching for prey.

A Sailfin Blenny spotted at the dive site Atlantis. Also, known as Kite Beach, this site can only be safely dived on a windless day when there are no kiteboarders.

A Sailfin Blenny spotted at the dive site Atlantis. Also, known as Kite Beach, this site can only be safely dived on a windless day when there are no kiteboarders.

Due to the fact that Kiteboarder's have claimed the Atlantis dive site, it rarely sees scuba divers. This has allowed the sea fans and coral to flourish. Here is a shot of a very healthy and large fan.

Due to the fact that Kiteboarder’s have claimed the Atlantis dive site, it rarely sees scuba divers. This has allowed the sea fans and coral to flourish. Here is a shot of a very healthy and large fan.

A Tui Boeing 787 Dreamliner on final approach to Bonaire's Flamingo International Airport.

A Tui Boeing 787 Dreamliner on final approach to Bonaire’s Flamingo International Airport.

What have you seen in Bonaire this week?

Jul 142016
 

Here is a glimpse of life on dushi Bonaire this week.  The weather has been beautiful, and we’ve had a few much needed downpours.  Life is good!

Children on a kayak at Lac Cai

Children on a kayak at Lac Cai

Kites galore at Kite Beach

Kites galore at Kite Beach

pelican in flight S

A pelican in flight over the west coast

A glimpse of the southwest coast, including Red Slave

A glimpse of the southwest coast, including Red Slave

A Tui Dreamliner (Boeing 787) takes off for the 10 hour trip to Amsterdam

A Tui Dreamliner (Boeing 787) departs BON for the 10 hour trip to Amsterdam

Portrait of a Snowy Egret

Portrait of a Snowy Egret

A pelican perches on a fishing boat in downtown Kralendijk

A pelican perches on a fishing boat in downtown Kralendijk

Jul 112016
 

We’ve had a lot going on recently, and I haven’t posted on the blog as much as I would like.  Between travel, a planned surgery and other real-life responsibilities, the blog has taken a short-term backseat.  Thankfully, we are sitting on a trove of photos that I intend to post soon.

Until then, I want to make sure that you know where else you can find us.  We update both our Facebook page and our Instagram much more often (our Instagram has daily updates).  So please head there to see what we are up to.

Kindest Regards from Latitude 12,

Meredith & Steve

ocean colors with boat

Jun 032016
 

World Ocean’s Day is June 8th, and this year’s theme is “Healthy oceans, healthy planet”.  It’s been a while since we’ve discussed plastic pollution here on the blog, so in the spirit of World Ocean’s Day 2016, we wanted to reinstate a serial post called Breakup with Plastic, Makeup with the Ocean.

In these short periodic posts, we will provide a tip as to how you can reduce, reuse or recycle your plastic wares.

flyer-top-NoDate

Tip 4 – Eliminate the use of beauty and personal care products containing plastic microbeads.

First, what are microbeads?  Microbeads are tiny plastic balls that are used in some cosmetic exfoliators, body washes, facial washes, scrubs, toothpastes and other products.

Why are microbeads bad?  Microbeads are a major source of plastic pollution in our oceans, lakes and other bodies of water.  Due to their minute size, they are not filtered out of the wastewater at sewage treatment plants. Also, they act as toxin absorbers, causing harm when they are inevitably ingested by marine life.  Eventually these tiny spheres move up the food chain, and we all know what that means for human who consume fish.

How can I determine that my products are microbead free?  By 2017, it will be illegal to manufacture and sell a cosmetic product containing microbeads in the United States.  Until then, or if you live in an area that has not banned microbeads, become a label-reading sleuth.  Look for the ingredients polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene, nylon or polymethlyl methacrylate, especially when purchasing products which claim to exfoliate or deep clean the skin.

Plastic pollution of our oceans may be a HUGE issue, but small changes CAN and DO help.  Please remember that your actions add up.

 

More about World Ocean’s Day 2016

This year World Ocean’s Day is organizing a Better Bag Challenge.  By taking the challenge, you promise not to take any disposable plastic bags for a whole year.  You can share your commitment on social media using the hashtag #BetterBagChallenge.

challenge-box

May 122016
 

The Carmabi Marine Research Station based in Curacao has published its annual coral spawning calendar for the southern Caribbean, including Bonaire.

Coral Spawning Bonaire

2015 Spawning Event captured by Steve

If you are in Bonaire during August, September or October, you may be lucky enough to witness this amazing reproductive activity.  In order to maximize your chances, it’s best to find an experienced guide.

Bonaire Coral Spawning Calendar 2016