Feb 152013
 

Mr. Reeftraveler shot the photos below on our last trip to Grand Cayman.  I found them today in our Lightroom catalog, did some basic editing, and determined that we had previously overlooked a few gems.

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These photos were shot with a Canon S90 with a Fisheye Fix Housing and Sea & Sea YS-110a strobe.

You can see more of our Grand Cayman photos here and here

Feb 112013
 

Perhaps the only good aspect of a Twin Otter flight (other than getting to your destination) is the fact that, weather permitting, it allows for decent aerial photography (yes, I’m the geek holding the camera to the aircraft window ignoring the snickers and stares from other passengers).  I’m sure many would laugh and disagree, but I consider this a kind of art form.  It’s not easy to get a decent photograph while shooting through a scratched window.  And then you have weather, wings, sunlight (whether friend or foe), speed and altitude to contend with.

On a recent trip to Fiji, conditions allowed me to snap many an aerial photograph, and much to my surprise, some of them are worthy of posting here.

From Savusavu to Taveuni

Savusavu Reef

Somosomo Strait

Taveuni - the Garden Isle

Taveuni – the Garden Isle

Verdant Taveuni

Verdant Taveuni

 

From Taveuni to Nadi

Namena Marine Reserve

Namena Marine Reserve

Namale Resort, Savusavu

Namale Resort, Savusavu

First Glimpse of Bligh Waters

First Glimpse of Bligh Waters

Bligh Waters

Bligh Waters

Bligh Waters - a diving paradise

Bligh Waters – a diving paradise

Double Rainbow

Double Rainbow

Hello Viti Levu

Hello Viti Levu

Viti Levu River

Viti Levu River

Approaching Nadi

Approaching Nadi

Do you take aerial shots when flying over interesting areas?  Or are you strictly an aisle person?

If you liked this post, you may also appreciate this collection of aerial shots.

Feb 072013
 

I’ve long been a fan of rashguards for snorkeling, swimming and beach going.  And while I still find them indispensable, I need more sun protection for my 2+ hour snorkeling expeditions.  You simply can’t count on sunscreens to protect the backs of your legs for 2 hours in the water.

I’ve recently found a perfect solution to this problem – this dive skin/stinger suit from ecostinger.

Ecostinger suit

Snorkeling in Savusavu Bay, Fiji

This suit is so comfortable you could sleep in it (not that I’ve done that).  It fits like a glove, and the fabric is holding up beautifully (no piling).  And the sun protection is UPF 50, which means no awful sunburns.

I think I’ve gotten a compliment almost every time I’ve worn this suit.  I’m often asked by strangers where they can get one, so I thought I would share the scoop here.

So maybe you only snorkel for 15 or 20 minutes at a time.  Why would you want or need to wear a dive skin?

  • You want to avoid jellyfish stings.
  • You want to avoid a full body sunscreen application (just remember your neck, hands and feet).
  • You become cold easily (a dive skin will provide a bit of warmth).
  • You take a medication that causes sun sensitivity, and you burn, blister or develop a rash even when using sunscreen properly.
  • It’s looks pretty sleek.
  • You are tired of burning the backs of your legs while snorkeling.

Needless to say, I’m sold on this suit.  It’s become a permanent part of my gear bag.  And as a disclaimer, I purchased this suit myself.  It was not given to me in connection with a promotion.

I should mention that these suits are not just for girls.  Ecostinger carries suits for men and kids too.

What do you wear while snorkeling?  Do you rely on a rashguard?  Do you simply load up on sunscreen and head out in your swimsuit?